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Welcome to London Marriott Hotel County Hall

Address: London County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7PB

Hotel Description

With fantastic views of Big Ben and the River Thames, this historic 5-star Marriott hotel boasts a swimming pool and relaxing spa. Its spacious rooms include luxurious bathrobes and Egyptian cotton sheets. Guests get 1 hour of free Wi-Fi in the public areas. Each of the elegant rooms at the Marriott London County Hall offers a marble bathroom, slippers, and an LCD TV with satellite channels. Guests can relax in luxury bedding, and some rooms have beautiful river views. Waterloo Station is just a 10-minute walk away, while Buckingham Palace can be reached in less than 25 minutes on foot. Westminster Abbey and St James Park are both a 15-minute walk away. The Marriott’s fitness club offers a modern gym with fitness classes and personal trainers. There is a sauna and a steam room, while the spa provides a range of treatments. Overlooking the River Thames, Gillrays Steakhouse & Bar offers a selection of steaks and English traditional food, made of locally sourced ingredients.

Our Facilities

  • Restaurant
  • Bar
  • Laundry Service
  • Massage

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Attractions - London Marriott Hotel County Hall

London Eye - Landmark

London Eye - Landmark

Distance 0.1 miles (0.16 km)
Since opening in March 2000 the EDF Energy London Eye has become an iconic landmark and a symbol of modern Britain. The London Eye is the UK's most popular paid for visitor attraction, visited by over 3.5 million people a year. A breathtaking feat of design and engineering, passengers in the London Eyes capsules can see up to 40 kilometres in all directions. The London Eye is the vision of David Marks and Julia Barfield, a husband and wife architect team. The wheel design was used as a metaphor for the end of the 20th century, and time turning into the new millennium. Back in 2000, the London Eye was known as the Millennium Wheel. At that time, British Airways was the main sponsor, and up until November 2005 they were joint shareholders with Marks Barfield Architects and The Tussauds Group. British Airways also privately funded the London Eye project from the early stages of conception. Today, the London Eye is operated by the London Eye Company Limited, a Merlin Entertainments Group Company.

Houses of Parliament - Country Home

Houses of Parliament - Country Home

Distance 0.21 miles (0.33 km)
The Houses of Parliament, otherwise known as The Palace of Westminster, stands on the site where Edward the Confessor had the original palace built in the first half of the eleventh century. In 1547 the royal residence was moved to Whitehall Palace, but the Lords continued to meet at Westminster, while the commons met in St. Stephen's Chapel. Ever since these early times, the Palace of Westminster has been home to the English Parliament. In 1834 a fire broke out which destroyed much of the old palace, all that remained was the chapel crypt, The Jewel Tower and Westminster Hall. It was Lord Melbourne, the Prime Minister, who saved the great hall by arranging for the fire engines to be brought right into the hall and personally supervising the fire fighting operation.

Big Ben - London - Landmark

Big Ben - London - Landmark

Distance 0.21 miles (0.34 km)
The clock tower looks spectacular at night when the four clock faces are illuminated.
Each dial is 23 feet square (49.15 square metres)
Big Ben's minute hands are 14 feet long (4.26 metres)
The figures on the face of Big Ben are two feet high (0.6 metres)
A special light above the clock faces is also illuminated, letting the public know when parliament is in session.
Big Ben's timekeeping is strictly regulated by a stack of coins placed on the huge pendulum. Big Ben has rarely stopped. Even after a bomb destroyed the Commons chamber during the Second World War, the clock tower survived and Big Ben continued to strike the hours.

The chimes of Big Ben were first broadcast by the BBC on 31 December 1923, a tradition that continues to this day.
The Palace of Westminster was destroyed by fire in 1834. In 1844, it was decided the new buildings for the Houses of Parliament should include a tower and a clock. The bell was refashioned in Whitechapel in 1858 and the clock first rang across Westminster on 31 May 1859.
Just two months later, Big Ben cracked. A lighter hammer was fitted and the bell rotated to present an undamaged section to the hammer. This is the bell as we hear it today.
The origin of the name Big Ben is not known, although two different theories exist.
The first is that is was named after Sir Benjamin Hall, the first commissioner of works, a large man who was known affectionately in the house as "Big Ben".
The second theory is that it was named after a heavyweight boxing champion at that time, Benjamin Caunt. Also known as "Big Ben", this nickname was commonly bestowed in society to anything that was the heaviest in its class.

The Banqueting House - Whitehall Palace - Country Home

The Banqueting House - Whitehall Palace - Country Home

Distance 0.26 miles (0.41 km)
The Banqueting House, opposite Horse Guards Parade, is the sole surviving complete building of Whitehall Palace, the sovereigns principal residence until the reign of William III.The Palace was built by the renowned 17th century architect Inigo Jones for King James to hold state occasions including masques, plays and state banquets and was once one of the largest palaces in Europe. Sadly, the majority of the palaces buildings were lost in the devastating fire of 1698.